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Reminder: Upcoming 2022 Annual Analysis

Each year, agency and independent providers are required to conduct an in-depth review and analysis of any MUIs that occurred during the previous calendar year (See section 5123-17-02(L) of the MUI Rule). The goal of this analysis is to identify agency-wide and individual-specific MUI trends & patterns, and then develop action plans to address and mitigate concerning trends. Read More ›

Photo of Senior Manager MUI Wayne Hershey.

Thank you from the Summit DD MUI Team

As another year comes to a close, I wanted to take a moment to thank our entire provider community for their continued commitment and support of those we both serve.

We could not ensure the health and welfare of those with developmental disabilities in Summit County without your hard work and dedication. I look forward to strengthening our partnership and support for one another in the coming year.

As always, please do not hesitate to reach out to me with any ideas you may have to improve our relationship or suggestions for new ways to partner in the future. On behalf of the whole Summit DD MUI team, I wish you and yours a very happy holiday season!

-Wayne Hershey, Senior Manager of MUI
Smiling staff with phone headset on

Staff Spotlight: Intake Investigative Agent II, Kim Bell

Intake Investigative Agent II, Kim Bell has been with Summit DD for nearly 20 years. While Bell initially got an accounting degree from Stark State College and spent several years working in the field, she says that she knew she wanted to do something where she could help people and make a difference. In 2003, she began working with Summit DD. She has worked in various roles throughout her time with the Agency and joined the MUI department in 2016 after obtaining her IA certification. Read More ›

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Alert: Shunt Care

Hydrocephalus (a condition where there is extra cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain) is usually treated by surgically placing a shunt near the brain or spinal cord. A shunt allows the extra CSF to flow from the brain to another part of the body.

If the shunt is not working properly (no matter how long it has been in place) and not treated promptly, it can result in permanent neurological (brain) damage or death.

Learn the important symptoms to look for in any individual with a brain shunt. Read More ›

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